If anything ends up on the beds of hobbyist-grade laser cutters more often than birch plywood, it’s probably sheets of acrylic. There’s something strangely satisfying about watching a laser beam trace over a sheet of the crystal-clear stuff, vaporizing a hairs-breadth line while it goes, and (hopefully) leaving a flame-polished cut in its wake. Acrylic, more properly known as poly(methyl methacrylate) or PMMA, is a wonder material that helped win a war before being developed for peacetime use. It has some interesting chemistry and properties that position it well for use in the home shop as everything from simple enclosures to laser-cut parts like gears and sprockets. Like many of the polymers that the world is built on, PMMA was first commercialized in the early 20th century. The plastic’s root go back much further, though. Acrylic acids, including methacrylic acid, were first synthesized in the mid-19th century. Methyl methacrylate (MMA), the monomer from which PMMA is built, was first synthesized later in that century, and the first successful polymerization was carried out in 1874. The key to polymerizing methyl methacrylate is the double bond between the two carbons. That b...